Friday (vintage) pet blogging

Back when Alfie was a wee thing. Still a terror but a wee terror. They still do this, btw.

Sunday morning comin’ down video: little poodle dog

gabby

Mademoiselle Gabby would likely find this most unseemly:

(damn, does Marcia Ball rock or what?)

Friday multi-species household blogging

Cat outside meowing, CHECK

2nd cat, inside, meowing, CHECK

Dog glurping from nearby water bowl, CHECK

Dog snuffling wet nose in my face, CHECK

Parrot loudly riffing, CHECK

More dog glurping, CHECK.   Mmmmm, water

I love how Alfie can see me, but goes to the other door as if there’s someone he’s never met that just might live here and will let him in, since I’ve obviously lost my mind

Rest in peace, Louie

For Katie, who adored and loved him and gave him a wonderful life.

blueforkatie

Hear that lonesome whippoorwill
He sounds too blue to fly
The midnight train is whining low
I’m so lonesome I could cry

I’ve never seen a night so long
When time goes crawling by
The moon just went behind the clouds
To hide its face and cry

Did you ever see a robin weep
When leaves begin to die
That mean’s he’s lost his will to live
I’m so lonesome I could cry

The silence of a falling star
Lights up a purple sky
And as I wonder where you are
I’m so lonesome I could cry

[UPDATED:  Just to clear up any confusion, I did not write this.  This song, “I’m so Lonesome I Could Cry,” was written in 1949 by Hank Williams. ]

The original dog

Each dog is splendid and unique to the one who loves dogs and chooses to live with them.  But many of us have that one dog, often long passed, that began it all, that changed everything, that taught us.  This is that dog, my original dog.

painter

Rescuegrass

gromgrass

It was hard to get back up again.

One thing, then another, then too many to note separately began to weigh me down, make me stop moving. Free time became, literally, down time.

I told myself with all the class field trips I was getting enough exercise. I told myself I needed to stay off the bad knee. I told myself I’d make it up next week. I told myself after the rainy season, then I told myself it was too hot to bother.

I’d go out once but wait days to go again. I stupidly got grass spears all over my shoes, an impossible amount of the stickery tips in every crevice and meshed seam, and I used that as an excuse, putting off for several weeks the tedium of picking the stuff out.

It was physical, it was the menopause, the knee, the thyroid, the weight. It was psychological, another wave of post-divorce inertia following in pair after a manic push; it was fucking stress from work, too much of the new software transition, too many meetings, too much unpaid overtime, too much of not enough help. Too much longing to just stop.

It was not one thing and it was everything at once. Whatever it was, I’d stopped getting out and about on foot. Stopped doing the usual reconnaissance with the dogs in the morning and evenings, following the deer trails through the high grass and flowers, poking along the old unpaved ranch roads that thread through this heavily-wooded, half empty subdivision. I’d stopped moving any more than was absolutely necessary, stopped being in my walking body, stopped wanting to know what was happening out there.

So now, I’ve let them talk me back into it. The dogs, I mean. Once is enough to get them jazzed, two times in a row is enough for them to expect it, to eye the front door and sniff the air coming in under it from outside. They have plenty of room to romp and run during the day. But they still love the walk.

The older dog especially. He pulls me along, not obnoxiously, not out of control, just enough to keep me going. The younger dog still gets us all three tangled, still spazzily wraps his legs, not getting yet that he can step out of the tangle when I give him the slack.

The old guy knows the gear, is well-trained and in sync, knows how to avoid wrapping the leash, knows how to help me straighten things out if we snag up. Still and all, he likes to force the leash just a little, he likes the resistance I offer. In truth, so do I, making real the inertia I feel, the urge to pull back against time moving on. I like the drag and I like his steady urging at the end of the leash.

In open pasture, he’s off leash and then he just turns and waits on me, encouraging with the force of his will, with his sturdy soldiering enthusiasm.

He’s a good dog and he likes having a job. He’s got a few of them, patrolling the fence line, keeping the pup in line, and now, again, pulling me back toward life.

Alfie goes walkabout

Alfie’s been chomping at the bit to go all the way outside, not just onto the deck and yesterday evening, I allowed him a bit of an “expotition” into the great wild beyond of my chaotic backyard.

I’m proceeding with caution before he goes solo. Yeah, I know he’s a cat and has loads of natural instinct. But so do the coyotes and the hawks and owls and snakes out there, not to mention the neighbors’ cats and dogs.

outside 1
Kitty and bodyguard, with the camera crew bringing up the rear.

outside2
After about three minutes, he went straight up a tree, as in almost to the very top. He was stalking about, doing that huffing Flehmen response thing, and in this shot, seriously contemplating a leap UP into an adjacent tree. He decided instead to jump the 15 feet to the ground from here, instead of climbing down. He plummeted like a little sack of dirt, not so graceful.

outside 3
The debriefing.

“Hay guise!! I was up a tree! Do I smell different? Am I a tiger now?”